Week 9: regrouping and restarting

PASSWORD ACCESS TO PDFs: Username and password can be found on the Canvas Homepage

ACCESS TO ZOOM SESSION: Login link, or User ID and password can be found on the Canvas Homepage

Pad for anonymous comments

General Announcement:

The most important changes for remote learning: look at this page

As we move into remote learning, some of the rhythm and tasks will change. I want to lay out the basics of how I view the course for this week and next week. I welcome your feedback on workload, types of tasks and types of engagement with the learning community (synchronous or asynchronous).

  1. Canvas discussion posts: It will be a better use of our time and broadband if we use the Discussions function in Canvas to mimic our in-class discussions. They will this week function as follows:
    • Create by Wednesday 5pm a first response with your thoughts. I will include a word count to guide you. I am looking for substantial posts that contain some analysis, not merely observation.
    • Once you posted your post, you’ll be able to see what others say on the discussion board. Look through those posts, ideally after Wednesday 5pm so you can see everybody’s first post.
    • Respond by Thursday noon to at least 2 other students’ posts. You can “thread” the discussions.
    • I will take a look through the posts to identify main issues, and address those in our shared Zoom session on Thursday, starting at 1 pm. Be there if you can.
  2. Zoom meetings: I have set up a Zoom link that has the password embedded, and all info you need to phone in.
    • All details can be found on our course Canvas site. We will use the same link for the rest of the semester.
    • You can join a Zoom session using a meeting ID and password, or a link.
    • If you don’t have reliable broadband at the time of the meeting: use the phone. You will only have audio, but you can catch up with the video later.
    • If you need some assistance, check out this page from the DLAs (I think they get the credit, but correct me if I’m wrong!)
  3. Signup sheet for drop-in tutorials (Gdrive link): Wed. 1-2, Thu 11-12, Fri. 2-3
  4. At the end of each week, we can evaluate and fine-tune our approach to your learning.
  5. End of week reflection: will focus on how you are adjusting to remote learning, and what works and what doesn’t. More details to follow.

Course contents and tasks for week 9:

Please read the texts below, and watch the first video. Then go to Canvas and post to the discussion by Wednesday, 5pm. Respond to two of your classmates’ posts by Thursday 12pm.

Zoom in to our meeting on Thursday, March 19, at 1pm. Please show up a few minutes early so we can start promptly. The meeting will be recorded and posted to Canvas in case circumstances prevent you from attending live. Details for the meeting can be found on the Canvas home page.

To read for the discussion on Canvas:

  • Primary source: Seami Motokiyo. “The Art of Nō”. In Anthology of Japanese Literature: Earliest Era to Mid-nineteenth Century, compiled and edited by Donald Keene, 259-262. Unesco Collection of Representative Works. New York: Grove Press, 1955. (PDF)
          • Seami (or Zeami) was a major figure in the development of Nō (or Noh) theater. What are the key concepts for Nō, in his view? Do you see connections with earlier discussions of Japanese aesthetics? You can also cross-check with this week’s optional extra “Essays in Idleness” by Yoshida Kenkō.
  • Primary source: “Atsumori” (attributed to Seami). In Traditional Japanese Literature: An Anthology. Beginnings to 1600. Edited by Haruo Shirane, 980-991. Columbia Univ. Press, 2007. (PDF)
          • The story of Atsumori, first recorded in the Tale of Heike, was retold in different new forms. This is the Nō version. How do the characteristics of a Nō play fit the content of this story? Does this interpretation of Kumagai Naozane/Renshō’s life after the battle fit with the Tale of Heike?
  • Videos: Please watch the first
    • “Acting Techniques of the Noh Theatre of Japan.” Directed by Larry McMullen, Akira Matsui, and Michigan State University. Department of Theatre. Michigan State University, 1980. Online Video. (30mins)
            • Video demonstrating basics and techniques
    • “Noh: The Classical Theatre of Japan.” Directed by Larry McMullen, Akira Matsui, and Michigan State University. Department of Theatre. Performed by Akira Matsui. Michigan State University, 1980. Online Video.
            • Extracts from two different types of Nō characters, but without the elaborate costuming. Watch if interested.
  • Optional extra: Yoshida Kenkō. “Essays in Idleness.” In Anthology of Japanese Literature: Earliest Era to Mid-nineteenth Century, compiled and edited by Donald Keene, 231-241. Unesco Collection of Representative Works. New York: Grove Press, 1955. (PDF)
  • Recording of zoom session (Canvas link; machine captions not edited)
  • Slides (Gdrive link)